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    Chemical, Corrosion and Topographical Analysis of Stainless Steel Implants after Different Implantation Periods

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    The aim of this work is to examine the corrosion properties, chemical composition, and material-implant interaction after different periods of implantation of plates used to correct funnel chest. The implants are made of 316L stainless steel. Examinations are carried out on three implants: new (nonimplanted) and two implanted for 29 and 35 months. The corrosion study reveals that in the potential range that could occur in the physiological condition the new bar has the lowest current density and the highest corrosion potential. This indicates that the new plate has the highest corrosion resistance and the corrosion resistance could be reduced during implantation by the instruments used during the operation. XPS analysis reveals changes in the surface chemistry. The longer the implantation time the more carbon and oxygen are observed and only trace of elements such as Cr, Mo are detected indicating that surface is covered by an organic layer. On some parts of the implants whitish tissue is observed: the thickness of which increased with the time of implantation. This tissue was identified as an organic layer; mainly attached to the surface on the areas close to where the implant was bent to attain anatomical fit and thus where the implant has higher surface roughness. The study indicates that the chest plates are impaired by the implantation procedure and contact with biological environment. The organic layer on the surface shows that the implant did not stay passive but some reactions at the tissue-implant interface occurred. These reactions should be seen as positive, as it indicates that the implants were accepted by the tissues. Nevertheless, if the implants react, they may continue to release chromium, nickel, and other harmful ions long term as indicated by lower corrosion resistance of the implants following implantation.

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    Description

    Title : Chemical, Corrosion and Topographical Analysis of Stainless Steel Implants after Different Implantation Periods
    Author(s) : W. Chrzanowski, D. A. Armitage, J. C. Knowles, J. Szade, W. Korlacki, J. Marciniak
    Abstract : The aim of this work is to examine the corrosion properties, chemical composition, and material-implant interaction after different periods of implantation of plates used to correct funnel chest. The implants are made of 316L stainless steel. Examinations are carried out on three implants: new (nonimplanted) and two implanted for 29 and 35 months. The corrosion study reveals that in the potential range that could occur in the physiological condition the new bar has the lowest current density and the highest corrosion potential. This indicates that the new plate has the highest corrosion resistance and the corrosion resistance could be reduced during implantation by the instruments used during the operation. XPS analysis reveals changes in the surface chemistry. The longer the implantation time the more carbon and oxygen are observed and only trace of elements such as Cr, Mo are detected indicating that surface is covered by an organic layer. On some parts of the implants whitish tissue is observed: the thickness of which increased with the time of implantation. This tissue was identified as an organic layer; mainly attached to the surface on the areas close to where the implant was bent to attain anatomical fit and thus where the implant has higher surface roughness. The study indicates that the chest plates are impaired by the implantation procedure and contact with biological environment. The organic layer on the surface shows that the implant did not stay passive but some reactions at the tissue-implant interface occurred. These reactions should be seen as positive, as it indicates that the implants were accepted by the tissues. Nevertheless, if the implants react, they may continue to release chromium, nickel, and other harmful ions long term as indicated by lower corrosion resistance of the implants following implantation.
    Subject : unspecified
    Area : Other
    Language : English
    Year : 2008

    Affiliations UCL
    Journal : Journal of Biomaterials Applications
    Volume : 23
    Issue : 1
    Publisher : SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD
    Pages : 51 - 71
    Url : http://jba.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/0885328207083728
    Doi : 10.1177/0885328207083728

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