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    block this user Jill Jameson

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    University of Greenwich
    Centre for Leadership and Enterprise

    Investigating collaborative leadership for communities of practice in learning and skills

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    This research report on the findings of a collaborative leadership research was funded by the Centre for Excellence in Leadership (CEL) at Lancaster University in 2006-07. The project aimed to collect and analyse data on collaborative leadership (CL) in the learning and skills sector (LSS). The project investigated collaborative leadership and its potential for benefiting staff through trust and knowledge sharing in communities of practice (CoPs). The project complemented CELs ongoing work in the Collaboration in Leadership programme (CiL), aiming to promote advantageous aspects of CL and avoid possible pitfalls. Using an online survey research design, the project collected 221 survey responses on collaborative leadership from a range of participants in or connected with the sector.Collaborative leadership has increasingly gained international prominence as emphasis has shifted towards team leadership approaches beyond zero-sum leadership/followership polarities into mature conceptions of shared leadership spaces, within which synergistic collaboration may be mediated. The relevance of collaboration to the LSS has been highlighted following the 2006 FE White Paper. The promotion of CL addresses concerns about the apparent remoteness of some senior managers, and neo-management control of professionals which increases distance between leaders and followers and may de-professionalise staff. Positive benefit from collaborative advantage tends to be assumed in idealistic interpretations of CL, but potential collaborative inertia may be problematic in a sector characterised by topdown policy changes. Constant pressure for achievement against goals leaves little time for democratic group negotiations, despite the desires of leaders to create a collaborative ethos. Prior models of intentional communities of practice (CoPs) potentially offer promise for CL practice to improve group performance. The CAMEL model (JISC infoNet, 2006) provides one potential practical way of implementing CL.

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    Description

    Title : Investigating collaborative leadership for communities of practice in learning and skills
    Author(s) : Jill Jameson
    Abstract : This research report on the findings of a collaborative leadership research was funded by the Centre for Excellence in Leadership (CEL) at Lancaster University in 2006-07. The project aimed to collect and analyse data on collaborative leadership (CL) in the learning and skills sector (LSS). The project investigated collaborative leadership and its potential for benefiting staff through trust and knowledge sharing in communities of practice (CoPs). The project complemented CELs ongoing work in the Collaboration in Leadership programme (CiL), aiming to promote advantageous aspects of CL and avoid possible pitfalls. Using an online survey research design, the project collected 221 survey responses on collaborative leadership from a range of participants in or connected with the sector.Collaborative leadership has increasingly gained international prominence as emphasis has shifted towards team leadership approaches beyond zero-sum leadership/followership polarities into mature conceptions of shared leadership spaces, within which synergistic collaboration may be mediated. The relevance of collaboration to the LSS has been highlighted following the 2006 FE White Paper. The promotion of CL addresses concerns about the apparent remoteness of some senior managers, and neo-management control of professionals which increases distance between leaders and followers and may de-professionalise staff. Positive benefit from collaborative advantage tends to be assumed in idealistic interpretations of CL, but potential collaborative inertia may be problematic in a sector characterised by topdown policy changes. Constant pressure for achievement against goals leaves little time for democratic group negotiations, despite the desires of leaders to create a collaborative ethos. Prior models of intentional communities of practice (CoPs) potentially offer promise for CL practice to improve group performance. The CAMEL model (JISC infoNet, 2006) provides one potential practical way of implementing CL.
    Keywords : lb2300 higher education

    Subject : unspecified
    Area : Other
    Language : English
    Year : 2007

    Affiliations University of Greenwich
    Journal : Learning
    Volume : 3
    Issue : March
    Publisher : Lancaster University
    Pages : 3-24
    Url : http://gala.gre.ac.uk/2896/

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